Monthly Archives: August 2005

Why Knowledge Management is So Important

As most of you know, I recently spent ten years as CKO of a large professional services firm. I quit to start my own business — writing books and consulting mainly on business innovation and entrepreneurship. My reason for doing … Continue reading

Posted in Working Smarter | 8 Comments

Saturday Links — a Day Late

We hosted the annual neighbourhood BBQ yesterday, so this week’s ‘best links of the week’ post is a little late. Another post to follow later today. The Innovation-Centric Company: From Roger Smith at the Fast Company Blog, what it takes … Continue reading

Posted in Using Weblogs and Technology | Comments Off on Saturday Links — a Day Late

Prisoners of Our Thoughts

Alex Pattakos’ book Prisoners of our Thoughts synthesizes the work of death camp survivor Viktor Frankl down to seven key principles that will help you be happier and more successful in your life: Exercise the freedom to choose your own … Continue reading

Posted in Working Smarter | 13 Comments

The World’s Ten Most Intractable Problems

My recent conversations with my colleagues working on AHA! have taken some intriguing turns, and since many of you have been very encouraging on this project, I wanted to share them with you. Just as a brief reminder on what … Continue reading

Posted in Preparing for Civilization's End | 17 Comments

Learning to Pay Attention

Since I vowed to do so a few months ago, I have been spending about half an hour per day living in the moment — focused, getting outside my head (and away from the PC), learning to pay attention. Some … Continue reading

Posted in Preparing for Civilization's End | 8 Comments

Homo Sapiens, Gatherer

Since our first appearance on the planet, the human diet has changed dramatically. While popular wisdom portrays us as primarily carnivorous hunter-gatherers from day one, there is increasing evidence that, not only do we have this backwards (which is why … Continue reading

Posted in Preparing for Civilization's End | 15 Comments

A Taxonomy of Learning, and Nature as Learning Role Model

Last week at our regular Breakfast at Flo’s meeting of KM practitioners we were talking about how people learn, and the significance of different learning styles and preferences for the successes and failures of various Knowledge Management programs and projects. … Continue reading

Posted in Our Culture / Ourselves, Working Smarter | 5 Comments

Coping, Insensitively

When you go into the army (or away to summer camp, or boarding school, or prison) one of the objectives is usually to get you to ‘mature’, to be more independent of those who have nurtured and sheltered you, to … Continue reading

Posted in Our Culture / Ourselves | 6 Comments

Five Links About Freedom

Stand Up for Freedom: The ACLU is sponsoring a contest for young people (17-29) to write essays and 30-second public service announcements on the importance of freedom. The results should be interesting. The link above seems to be blocked (perhaps … Continue reading

Posted in How the World Really Works | 2 Comments

Bush Shows His True Stripes on ‘Free’ Trade

Cartoon by Khalil Bendib for Corpwatch.orgThis from the CBC: On Aug. 10, 2005, an ìextraordinary challenge panelî under NAFTA dismissed American claims that the earlier NAFTA decision in favour of Canada violated trade rules.“We are extremely pleased that the ECC … Continue reading

Posted in How the World Really Works | 8 Comments